The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Which is the best football code? Here you can have it out with other football fans.

What is the No.1 Football Code in Australia?

Australian Football
63
58%
Rugby League
38
35%
Rugby Union
2
2%
Soccer
6
6%
 
Total votes: 109

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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by Quolls2019 »

Football Bits

2023 National Championships.

ESPN
Jasper Chellappah
Jul 12, 2023, 06:57 AM

500,000 kms, 350 flights: Why the Allies' U18 National Championships victory is a win for footy

The 2023 National Championships-winning Allies side is the latest -- and perhaps greatest -- indication that Aussie Rules can prosper in rugby league heartland.
No Allies side in its seven-year history had won more than once at the four-round carnival, but this edition blitzed its way to an undefeated, maiden championship in a remarkable display of the junior footy talent across the country.
The Allies eased past South Australia by 18 points, flexed their muscle with a 14-goal demolition of Western Australia, then turned all heads in the footy industry with a 44-point thumping of Vic Metro. On Sunday they were crowned champions after an enthralling 11-point victory over Harley Reid's Vic Country.
It's arguably the biggest task in junior footy -- bringing together the best of New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, the ACT and the Northern Territory, and attempting to play a cohesive brand against well-drilled teams from footballing states. Those same teams have been playing together at representative level through the years, opportunities not afforded to this Allies group.




The 2023 National Championships-winning Allies side is the latest -- and perhaps greatest -- indication that Aussie Rules can prosper in rugby league heartland.

No Allies side in its seven-year history had won more than once at the four-round carnival, but this edition blitzed its way to an undefeated, maiden championship in a remarkable display of the junior footy talent across the country.
The Allies eased past South Australia by 18 points, flexed their muscle with a 14-goal demolition of Western Australia, then turned all heads in the footy industry with a 44-point thumping of Vic Metro. On Sunday they were crowned champions after an enthralling 11-point victory over Harley Reid's Vic Country.
It's arguably the biggest task in junior footy -- bringing together the best of New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, the ACT and the Northern Territory, and attempting to play a cohesive brand against well-drilled teams from footballing states. Those same teams have been playing together at representative level through the years, opportunities not afforded to this Allies group.


Swans Academy coach and first-year Allies coach Mark McVeigh was given a three-day camp to set his boys up for success in the biggest footy showcase of their lives.

"The hardest part was trying to gel all these players together," McVeigh admitted to ESPN.
"Before the game against Vic Country we spoke about the fact that we'd travelled well over 500,000 kilometres, well over 350 flights amongst us to get to where we wanted to get to.
"We wanted to leave a legacy for the Allies to follow, so younger players that come through the system go 'Okay, I know how the Allies play'."
That Allies legacy has been established, with McVeigh's side playing run-and-gun, free-flowing footy. It was a style that suited the tenacity of a centre square brigade which could feature five first round picks come November.
They got the ball in quickly to unstoppable spearhead Jed Walter, and entrusted a well-drilled back six headlined by Allies MVP Connor O'Sullivan, whom McVeigh bullishly claims will "rocket up the draft" into top-10 calculations after his carnival.
Hailing from Albury, O'Sullivan is one of many showcasing the immense potential of the regions.
For McVeigh, it proves the strength in a northern academy system that rewards the Swans, Giants, Lions and Suns with first dibs on the talent funnelled through their junior pathways.

While it hasn't always been smooth sailing for the academy programs, the past eight years have proved that it's a premier developmental tool in footy.
Callum Mills was playing rugby for the Warringah Rats before his academy opportunity presented; Isaac Heeney similarly was ripped away from rugby's grasp in Newcastle when he was 12. Errol Gulden and Braeden Campbell were also 12 when they started their journey together.
Now, there are 750 kids training in the Swans Academy each year across the city, from ages 11 to 18. It's a football program that costs the club seven figures per annum, and it's one of four academies now vaulting Aussie Rules into the forefront of grassroots sport in traditional rugby league heartland.
"Without being too to the point, they got their s--- together," McVeigh said of the northern academies.
"The academies have put in place unbelievable programs from a girls and boys point of view where they come in and they're subjected to the best facilities, they're subjected to seeing their stars walking around, they have really good coaches.
"We turn up on time, we train really hard, we're respectful to everyone."
Whether it was Gold Coast's trio of first-round fancies Walter, Ethan Read and Jake Rogers, or Tasmania's dynamic midfield duo Colby McKercher and Ryley Sanders, the collective buy-in and professionalism from the Allies contingent supplanted the group's lack of time to get acquainted.

It reflects an academy system that is now the focal piece of list management for the NSW and QLD clubs

Palm Beach Currumbin boasts the esteemed trio of Suns Academy graduates that could change the complexion of Gold Coast from day one. The Riverina's Charlie McCormack is bearing the fruits of years with the Giants Academy.
The face of the Swans' Academy this year is Caiden Cleary, a tough inside midfielder who embodies the Bloods' uncompromising culture. He's set to attract a top 20 bid at the draft after honing his craft in the academy for years.
Whether it's Collingullie's hard-nosed Harry Perryman or Sabrina's star ruck export Lauren Bella, the northern academies are investing millions to grow the game and reap the benefits at the top level.
This all-conquering Allies side is both a product of that vision, and a glimpse into the future of footy.
There are lies, damn lies and then there are ratings.
Rugby league, Australias most popular game in some of North Eastern Australia.
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by Quolls2019 »

23/7/23

A-League outfit Perth Glory is in disarray after it was on Saturday placed into voluntary receivership.
The club is desperately searching for a new owner after long-time owner Tony Sage relinquished the club’s licence after a turbulent period for the club.

The Australian Professional Leagues (APL) – which runs the A-League – announced on Saturday that it had appointed advisory firm KordaMentha to “manage” the receivership process for the Glory, and that Sage would “cease in his ownership of the club immediately”.

APL has guaranteed Glory’s survival despite the enormous challenged it is facing.

The governing body claims the license is expected to be handed over within the next 10 weeks.

The 2023-24 A-League season begins October 13 — giving the club less than three months to get its house in order

The Age reports several parties have shown interest in considering an application to take over the license.

WA Today reported Saturday the club was forced to use loans from the APL in order to pay the wages of players and staff over the past five months — totalling around $5 million in debt.
There are lies, damn lies and then there are ratings.
Rugby league, Australias most popular game in some of North Eastern Australia.
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by Quolls2019 »

Australian Rugby Union has shot themselves in the foot. Similar as soccer does here often
Can they recover?
There are lies, damn lies and then there are ratings.
Rugby league, Australias most popular game in some of North Eastern Australia.
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by Skippy Steve »

We all know that the answer is AFL. You just have to Google it.
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by truthbomber »

Terry wrote: Mon Sep 25, 2023 1:05 pm
Skippy Steve wrote: Mon Sep 25, 2023 11:05 am We all know that the answer is AFL. You just have to Google it.
Your whole life is a google search Skip 'ol son!!!! Shallow, erratic and misinformed. Hop off back to the bush pal and re calibrate. You're making a fool of yaself!!!!!!
only mon^gs from Vicdumbia could conclude

that a sport that is watched by 30 million more people in a country ............isn't.... that countries numb one sport :cool:
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by Skippy Steve »

It takes more than just a Google search to prove the point because AFL is everywhere. It's even in your own neighbourhood, but you just choose not to see it.
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by truthbomber »

Skippy Steve wrote: Mon Sep 25, 2023 5:59 pm It takes more than just a Google search to prove the point because AFL is everywhere. It's even in your own neighbourhood, but you just choose not to see it.
you are correct for once

it takes the numbers
155 Mill for the NRL
125 Mill for racistball

silver for KKKball


again :cool:
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by Skippy Steve »

Is that all you have got? What about Grass roots level? What about participation? What about attendance? And so it goes on and on. Parents don't want their kids playing the bum sniffing game because they will get hurt in those spear tackles and head high shots etc.
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by Bbear »

Quolls2019 wrote: Wed Jul 12, 2023 1:20 pm Football Bits

2023 National Championships.

ESPN
Jasper Chellappah
Jul 12, 2023, 06:57 AM

500,000 kms, 350 flights: Why the Allies' U18 National Championships victory is a win for footy

The 2023 National Championships-winning Allies side is the latest -- and perhaps greatest -- indication that Aussie Rules can prosper in rugby league heartland.
No Allies side in its seven-year history had won more than once at the four-round carnival, but this edition blitzed its way to an undefeated, maiden championship in a remarkable display of the junior footy talent across the country.
The Allies eased past South Australia by 18 points, flexed their muscle with a 14-goal demolition of Western Australia, then turned all heads in the footy industry with a 44-point thumping of Vic Metro. On Sunday they were crowned champions after an enthralling 11-point victory over Harley Reid's Vic Country.
It's arguably the biggest task in junior footy -- bringing together the best of New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, the ACT and the Northern Territory, and attempting to play a cohesive brand against well-drilled teams from footballing states. Those same teams have been playing together at representative level through the years, opportunities not afforded to this Allies group.




The 2023 National Championships-winning Allies side is the latest -- and perhaps greatest -- indication that Aussie Rules can prosper in rugby league heartland.

No Allies side in its seven-year history had won more than once at the four-round carnival, but this edition blitzed its way to an undefeated, maiden championship in a remarkable display of the junior footy talent across the country.
The Allies eased past South Australia by 18 points, flexed their muscle with a 14-goal demolition of Western Australia, then turned all heads in the footy industry with a 44-point thumping of Vic Metro. On Sunday they were crowned champions after an enthralling 11-point victory over Harley Reid's Vic Country.
It's arguably the biggest task in junior footy -- bringing together the best of New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, the ACT and the Northern Territory, and attempting to play a cohesive brand against well-drilled teams from footballing states. Those same teams have been playing together at representative level through the years, opportunities not afforded to this Allies group.


Swans Academy coach and first-year Allies coach Mark McVeigh was given a three-day camp to set his boys up for success in the biggest footy showcase of their lives.

"The hardest part was trying to gel all these players together," McVeigh admitted to ESPN.
"Before the game against Vic Country we spoke about the fact that we'd travelled well over 500,000 kilometres, well over 350 flights amongst us to get to where we wanted to get to.
"We wanted to leave a legacy for the Allies to follow, so younger players that come through the system go 'Okay, I know how the Allies play'."
That Allies legacy has been established, with McVeigh's side playing run-and-gun, free-flowing footy. It was a style that suited the tenacity of a centre square brigade which could feature five first round picks come November.
They got the ball in quickly to unstoppable spearhead Jed Walter, and entrusted a well-drilled back six headlined by Allies MVP Connor O'Sullivan, whom McVeigh bullishly claims will "rocket up the draft" into top-10 calculations after his carnival.
Hailing from Albury, O'Sullivan is one of many showcasing the immense potential of the regions.
For McVeigh, it proves the strength in a northern academy system that rewards the Swans, Giants, Lions and Suns with first dibs on the talent funnelled through their junior pathways.

While it hasn't always been smooth sailing for the academy programs, the past eight years have proved that it's a premier developmental tool in footy.
Callum Mills was playing rugby for the Warringah Rats before his academy opportunity presented; Isaac Heeney similarly was ripped away from rugby's grasp in Newcastle when he was 12. Errol Gulden and Braeden Campbell were also 12 when they started their journey together.
Now, there are 750 kids training in the Swans Academy each year across the city, from ages 11 to 18. It's a football program that costs the club seven figures per annum, and it's one of four academies now vaulting Aussie Rules into the forefront of grassroots sport in traditional rugby league heartland.
"Without being too to the point, they got their s--- together," McVeigh said of the northern academies.
"The academies have put in place unbelievable programs from a girls and boys point of view where they come in and they're subjected to the best facilities, they're subjected to seeing their stars walking around, they have really good coaches.
"We turn up on time, we train really hard, we're respectful to everyone."
Whether it was Gold Coast's trio of first-round fancies Walter, Ethan Read and Jake Rogers, or Tasmania's dynamic midfield duo Colby McKercher and Ryley Sanders, the collective buy-in and professionalism from the Allies contingent supplanted the group's lack of time to get acquainted.

It reflects an academy system that is now the focal piece of list management for the NSW and QLD clubs

Palm Beach Currumbin boasts the esteemed trio of Suns Academy graduates that could change the complexion of Gold Coast from day one. The Riverina's Charlie McCormack is bearing the fruits of years with the Giants Academy.
The face of the Swans' Academy this year is Caiden Cleary, a tough inside midfielder who embodies the Bloods' uncompromising culture. He's set to attract a top 20 bid at the draft after honing his craft in the academy for years.
Whether it's Collingullie's hard-nosed Harry Perryman or Sabrina's star ruck export Lauren Bella, the northern academies are investing millions to grow the game and reap the benefits at the top level.
This all-conquering Allies side is both a product of that vision, and a glimpse into the future of footy.
The various academy programs have given the opportunity for many young athletes to succeed and even star in Australian rules football .
The costs associated with running these acadamys is worth every cent as you can see real outcomes.
A positive for the game.
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by AFLcrap1 »

Bbear wrote: Wed Sep 27, 2023 7:27 pm
Quolls2019 wrote: Wed Jul 12, 2023 1:20 pm Football Bits

2023 National Championships.

ESPN
Jasper Chellappah
Jul 12, 2023, 06:57 AM

500,000 kms, 350 flights: Why the Allies' U18 National Championships victory is a win for footy

The 2023 National Championships-winning Allies side is the latest -- and perhaps greatest -- indication that Aussie Rules can prosper in rugby league heartland.
No Allies side in its seven-year history had won more than once at the four-round carnival, but this edition blitzed its way to an undefeated, maiden championship in a remarkable display of the junior footy talent across the country.
The Allies eased past South Australia by 18 points, flexed their muscle with a 14-goal demolition of Western Australia, then turned all heads in the footy industry with a 44-point thumping of Vic Metro. On Sunday they were crowned champions after an enthralling 11-point victory over Harley Reid's Vic Country.
It's arguably the biggest task in junior footy -- bringing together the best of New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, the ACT and the Northern Territory, and attempting to play a cohesive brand against well-drilled teams from footballing states. Those same teams have been playing together at representative level through the years, opportunities not afforded to this Allies group.




The 2023 National Championships-winning Allies side is the latest -- and perhaps greatest -- indication that Aussie Rules can prosper in rugby league heartland.

No Allies side in its seven-year history had won more than once at the four-round carnival, but this edition blitzed its way to an undefeated, maiden championship in a remarkable display of the junior footy talent across the country.
The Allies eased past South Australia by 18 points, flexed their muscle with a 14-goal demolition of Western Australia, then turned all heads in the footy industry with a 44-point thumping of Vic Metro. On Sunday they were crowned champions after an enthralling 11-point victory over Harley Reid's Vic Country.
It's arguably the biggest task in junior footy -- bringing together the best of New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, the ACT and the Northern Territory, and attempting to play a cohesive brand against well-drilled teams from footballing states. Those same teams have been playing together at representative level through the years, opportunities not afforded to this Allies group.


Swans Academy coach and first-year Allies coach Mark McVeigh was given a three-day camp to set his boys up for success in the biggest footy showcase of their lives.

"The hardest part was trying to gel all these players together," McVeigh admitted to ESPN.
"Before the game against Vic Country we spoke about the fact that we'd travelled well over 500,000 kilometres, well over 350 flights amongst us to get to where we wanted to get to.
"We wanted to leave a legacy for the Allies to follow, so younger players that come through the system go 'Okay, I know how the Allies play'."
That Allies legacy has been established, with McVeigh's side playing run-and-gun, free-flowing footy. It was a style that suited the tenacity of a centre square brigade which could feature five first round picks come November.
They got the ball in quickly to unstoppable spearhead Jed Walter, and entrusted a well-drilled back six headlined by Allies MVP Connor O'Sullivan, whom McVeigh bullishly claims will "rocket up the draft" into top-10 calculations after his carnival.
Hailing from Albury, O'Sullivan is one of many showcasing the immense potential of the regions.
For McVeigh, it proves the strength in a northern academy system that rewards the Swans, Giants, Lions and Suns with first dibs on the talent funnelled through their junior pathways.

While it hasn't always been smooth sailing for the academy programs, the past eight years have proved that it's a premier developmental tool in footy.
Callum Mills was playing rugby for the Warringah Rats before his academy opportunity presented; Isaac Heeney similarly was ripped away from rugby's grasp in Newcastle when he was 12. Errol Gulden and Braeden Campbell were also 12 when they started their journey together.
Now, there are 750 kids training in the Swans Academy each year across the city, from ages 11 to 18. It's a football program that costs the club seven figures per annum, and it's one of four academies now vaulting Aussie Rules into the forefront of grassroots sport in traditional rugby league heartland.
"Without being too to the point, they got their s--- together," McVeigh said of the northern academies.
"The academies have put in place unbelievable programs from a girls and boys point of view where they come in and they're subjected to the best facilities, they're subjected to seeing their stars walking around, they have really good coaches.
"We turn up on time, we train really hard, we're respectful to everyone."
Whether it was Gold Coast's trio of first-round fancies Walter, Ethan Read and Jake Rogers, or Tasmania's dynamic midfield duo Colby McKercher and Ryley Sanders, the collective buy-in and professionalism from the Allies contingent supplanted the group's lack of time to get acquainted.

It reflects an academy system that is now the focal piece of list management for the NSW and QLD clubs

Palm Beach Currumbin boasts the esteemed trio of Suns Academy graduates that could change the complexion of Gold Coast from day one. The Riverina's Charlie McCormack is bearing the fruits of years with the Giants Academy.
The face of the Swans' Academy this year is Caiden Cleary, a tough inside midfielder who embodies the Bloods' uncompromising culture. He's set to attract a top 20 bid at the draft after honing his craft in the academy for years.
Whether it's Collingullie's hard-nosed Harry Perryman or Sabrina's star ruck export Lauren Bella, the northern academies are investing millions to grow the game and reap the benefits at the top level.
This all-conquering Allies side is both a product of that vision, and a glimpse into the future of footy.
The various academy programs have given the opportunity for many young athletes to succeed and even star in Australian rules football .
The costs associated with running these acadamys is worth every cent as you can see real outcomes.
A positive for the game.
I thinks it’s good that the lesser uncoordinated youth can play a game where fumbling bumbling & not kicking straight are rewarded .
The real athletes will stick to games where those attributes are penalized .
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by truthbomber »

Bbear wrote: Wed Sep 27, 2023 7:27 pm
Quolls2019 wrote: Wed Jul 12, 2023 1:20 pm Football Bits

2023 National Championships.

ESPN
Jasper Chellappah
Jul 12, 2023, 06:57 AM

500,000 kms, 350 flights: Why the Allies' U18 National Championships victory is a win for footy

The 2023 National Championships-winning Allies side is the latest -- and perhaps greatest -- indication that Aussie Rules can prosper in rugby league heartland.
No Allies side in its seven-year history had won more than once at the four-round carnival, but this edition blitzed its way to an undefeated, maiden championship in a remarkable display of the junior footy talent across the country.
The Allies eased past South Australia by 18 points, flexed their muscle with a 14-goal demolition of Western Australia, then turned all heads in the footy industry with a 44-point thumping of Vic Metro. On Sunday they were crowned champions after an enthralling 11-point victory over Harley Reid's Vic Country.
It's arguably the biggest task in junior footy -- bringing together the best of New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, the ACT and the Northern Territory, and attempting to play a cohesive brand against well-drilled teams from footballing states. Those same teams have been playing together at representative level through the years, opportunities not afforded to this Allies group.




The 2023 National Championships-winning Allies side is the latest -- and perhaps greatest -- indication that Aussie Rules can prosper in rugby league heartland.

No Allies side in its seven-year history had won more than once at the four-round carnival, but this edition blitzed its way to an undefeated, maiden championship in a remarkable display of the junior footy talent across the country.
The Allies eased past South Australia by 18 points, flexed their muscle with a 14-goal demolition of Western Australia, then turned all heads in the footy industry with a 44-point thumping of Vic Metro. On Sunday they were crowned champions after an enthralling 11-point victory over Harley Reid's Vic Country.
It's arguably the biggest task in junior footy -- bringing together the best of New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, the ACT and the Northern Territory, and attempting to play a cohesive brand against well-drilled teams from footballing states. Those same teams have been playing together at representative level through the years, opportunities not afforded to this Allies group.


Swans Academy coach and first-year Allies coach Mark McVeigh was given a three-day camp to set his boys up for success in the biggest footy showcase of their lives.

"The hardest part was trying to gel all these players together," McVeigh admitted to ESPN.
"Before the game against Vic Country we spoke about the fact that we'd travelled well over 500,000 kilometres, well over 350 flights amongst us to get to where we wanted to get to.
"We wanted to leave a legacy for the Allies to follow, so younger players that come through the system go 'Okay, I know how the Allies play'."
That Allies legacy has been established, with McVeigh's side playing run-and-gun, free-flowing footy. It was a style that suited the tenacity of a centre square brigade which could feature five first round picks come November.
They got the ball in quickly to unstoppable spearhead Jed Walter, and entrusted a well-drilled back six headlined by Allies MVP Connor O'Sullivan, whom McVeigh bullishly claims will "rocket up the draft" into top-10 calculations after his carnival.
Hailing from Albury, O'Sullivan is one of many showcasing the immense potential of the regions.
For McVeigh, it proves the strength in a northern academy system that rewards the Swans, Giants, Lions and Suns with first dibs on the talent funnelled through their junior pathways.

While it hasn't always been smooth sailing for the academy programs, the past eight years have proved that it's a premier developmental tool in footy.
Callum Mills was playing rugby for the Warringah Rats before his academy opportunity presented; Isaac Heeney similarly was ripped away from rugby's grasp in Newcastle when he was 12. Errol Gulden and Braeden Campbell were also 12 when they started their journey together.
Now, there are 750 kids training in the Swans Academy each year across the city, from ages 11 to 18. It's a football program that costs the club seven figures per annum, and it's one of four academies now vaulting Aussie Rules into the forefront of grassroots sport in traditional rugby league heartland.
"Without being too to the point, they got their s--- together," McVeigh said of the northern academies.
"The academies have put in place unbelievable programs from a girls and boys point of view where they come in and they're subjected to the best facilities, they're subjected to seeing their stars walking around, they have really good coaches.
"We turn up on time, we train really hard, we're respectful to everyone."
Whether it was Gold Coast's trio of first-round fancies Walter, Ethan Read and Jake Rogers, or Tasmania's dynamic midfield duo Colby McKercher and Ryley Sanders, the collective buy-in and professionalism from the Allies contingent supplanted the group's lack of time to get acquainted.

It reflects an academy system that is now the focal piece of list management for the NSW and QLD clubs

Palm Beach Currumbin boasts the esteemed trio of Suns Academy graduates that could change the complexion of Gold Coast from day one. The Riverina's Charlie McCormack is bearing the fruits of years with the Giants Academy.
The face of the Swans' Academy this year is Caiden Cleary, a tough inside midfielder who embodies the Bloods' uncompromising culture. He's set to attract a top 20 bid at the draft after honing his craft in the academy for years.
Whether it's Collingullie's hard-nosed Harry Perryman or Sabrina's star ruck export Lauren Bella, the northern academies are investing millions to grow the game and reap the benefits at the top level.
This all-conquering Allies side is both a product of that vision, and a glimpse into the future of footy.
The various academy programs have given the opportunity for many young athletes to succeed and even star in Australian rules football .
The costs associated with running these acadamys is worth every cent as you can see real outcomes.
A positive for the game.
you know you're wankers when you call a rep team

the allies !
8-[

:hmm:

:lol: :lol: :rofl: :rofl: :(/ :(/ :(/ :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by Skippy Steve »

If you think that is funny, what about being called an immortal? lol
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by Skippy Steve »

But with an immortal, there can be only one. Gee, Thugby is a dumb game, hey. No wonder it will never be the number one code in Australia, hey.
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by truthbomber »

or

All Australian

:hmm:

8-[

All Australian ?
wtf is an All Australian ? :(/ :(/ :lol: :lol: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

their pathetic sport is a joke for .. half of all Australians

maybe they should be the
Half Australians ?? :-k

:lol: :lol: :rofl: :rofl: :(/ :(/ :(/
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Re: The No.1 Football Code in Australia

Post by cehar5 »

truthbomber wrote: Thu Sep 28, 2023 5:42 pm or

All Australian

:hmm:

8-[

All Australian ?
wtf is an All Australian ? :(/ :(/ :lol: :lol: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

their pathetic sport is a joke for .. half of all Australians

maybe they should be the
Half Australians ?? :-k

:lol: :lol: :rofl: :rofl: :(/ :(/ :(/
If you're confused about what an All Australian is, why don't you just look it up? Bit too complex?
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